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Dr. Ricardo Pérez de la Fuente

Ricardo Pérez de la Fuente
Current position:
Post-doctoral fellow, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Previous positions/career:
- PhD in Earth Sciences (2008-12), University of Barcelona ‚Äď ‚ÄúPaleobiolog√≠a de los artr√≥podos del √°mbar cret√°cico de El Soplao (Cantabria, Espa√Īa)‚ÄĚ.
- MSc in Paleontology (2007-08), University of Barcelona / Autonomous University of Barcelona ‚Äď ‚ÄúPaleobiolog√≠a de los insectos del Mioceno de los dep√≥sitos lacustres de La Cerdanya (Espa√Īa)‚ÄĚ.
- BSc in Biology with a concentration in Organisms and Systems (2003-07), University of Barcelona.

Phone: +34 617 496 1221
Email: perezdelafuente@fas.harvard.edu
Office: 403

Mailing address:
Oxford University Museum of Natural History,
Parks Road,
Oxford, OX1 3PW
London

Scientific research:
My research as a paleoentomologist, although necessarily grounded in taxonomy, not only consists of describing paleodiversity, but also aims to extract paleoecological, paleoethological, and taphonomical data from fossil terrestrial arthropods, namely insects and spiders. My research focuses on the Early Cretaceous, one of the most important epochs for the diversification of terrestrial arthropods, linked with the radiation of the angiosperms. I have, however, studied both adpression fossils (i.e., impressions and compressions) and amber inclusions from deposits spanning ~160 million years, from the Middle Jurassic to the Late Miocene.

Doctoral Thesis and post-doctoral research:
My MSc research assessed the paleodiversity of Late Miocene lacustrine sediments of La Cerdanya (Spain). I also performed taphonomic experiments on orthopterans and elateriform larvae to simulate the conditions prior to burial in lake sediments. By tracking parameters like time to death, sinking, disarticulation, and decay in these insects, I was able to characterize some of the taphonomic factors influencing fossilization processes and biases in the fossil record of lacustrine sediments. My PhD research aimed to characterize the paleoenvironment of the Early Cretaceous El Soplao (Spain) amber deposit using diverse lines of evidence, including paleoautoecological, paleobiogeographical, and paleoethological data gathered from arthropods in the amber, combined with geological, taphonomical, and further paleontological data developed by the ‚ÄúAmbar:es‚ÄĚ team. El Soplao amber, discovered in 2007, is now one of the main Cretaceous Spanish amber deposits both quantitatively and qualitatively, and the deposit has the potential to become one of the best sources of paleobiological data of life on Earth ~105 million years ago.

Current tasks:
My current position at the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, aims at digitizing its fossil insect collection, one of the premier fossil insect collections in the world and the result of the works of Prof. Frank M. Carpenter (1902-1994). This enterprise takes part of the Thematic Collections Network ‚ÄúFossil Insect Collaborative: A Deep-Time Approach to Studying Diversification and Response to Environmental Change‚ÄĚ. The Fossil Insect Collaborative is funded by the NSF‚Äôs ‚ÄúAdvance Digitization of Biodiversity Collections Program‚ÄĚ, and seeks to make available all the major collections of fossil insect specimens in the United States by creating electronic specimen records consisting of digital images and associated collection data. All this great amount of easily accessible data will have a significant impact on both education and research, and once integrated will ultimately allow to extract evolutionary, paleobiogeographical, and paleoecological broad-scale patterns.

Publications

I have published papers on fossil spiders and insects, i.e., cockroaches (‚ÄúBlattaria‚ÄĚ), crickets (Orthoptera), snakeflies (Raphidioptera), lacewings (Neuroptera), wasps (Hymenoptera), and nematoceran flies (Diptera). I have also contributed to multidisciplinary papers characterizing an amber outcrop and developing a ground-breaking technique for the study of amber inclusions. Overall, and together with the members of the ‚ÄúAmbar:es‚ÄĚ project and other colleagues, I have described about thirty fossil arthropod taxa, about twenty of them new to science. Of particular note is the discovery of early camouflaging behavior in bizarre Cretaceous lacewing larvae, which represented an intimate relationship between an insect and a fern. The discovery was covered by more than 70 newspapers and science journals/blogs worldwide, and it was on the front page of National Geographic‚Äôs international webpage.

Articles:

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Engel, M. S., Delcl√≤s, X. y Pe√Īalver, E. 2020. Straight-jawed lacewing larvae (Neuroptera) from Lower Cretaceous Spanish amber, with an account on the known amber diversity of neuropterid immatures. Cretaceous Research 106: 104200. DOI:10.1016/j.cretres.2019.104200.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. y Pe√Īalver, E. 2019. A mantidfly in Cretaceous Spanish amber provides insights into the evolution of integumentary specialisations on the raptorial foreleg. Scientific Reports 9: 13248. DOI:10.1038/s41598-019-49398-1.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Gehler, A., Farnum, C. W. y Farrell, B. D. 2019. Digitisation as a tool to promote transparency between collections: the case of the Baltic amber from the K√∂nigsberg collection at the Museum of Comparative Zoology. Spanish Journal of Paleontology 34(1): 145‚Äď151. Sin DOI.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E. y Engel, M. S. 2019. A new dustywing (Neuroptera: Coniopterygidae) from the Early Cretaceous amber of Spain. Palaeoentomology 2(3): 279‚Äí288. DOI:10.11646/ palaeoentomology.2.3.13.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Engel, M. S., Azar, D. y Pe√Īalver, E. 2019. The hatching mechanism of 130-million-year-old insects: an association of neonates, egg shells and egg bursters in Lebanese amber. Palaeontology 62(4): 547‚Äď559. DOI:10.1111/pala.12414.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Hoffeins, C. y Roh√°ńćek, J. 2018. A new Acartophthalmites Hennig from Eocene Baltic amber (Diptera: Acalyptratae). Zookeys 737: 125‚Äď139. DOI:10.3897/zookeys.737.20639.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Pe√Īalver, E., Azar, D. y Engel, M. S. 2018. A soil-carrying lacewing larva in Early Cretaceous Lebanese amber. Scientific Reports 8: 16663. DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-34870-1.

Pe√Īalver, E., Arillo, A., Delcl√≤s, X., Peris, D., Grimaldi, D. A., Anderson, S. R., Nascimbene, P. C. y P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. 2017. Ticks parasitised feathered dinosaurs as revealed by Cretaceous amber assemblages. Nature Communications 8: 1924. DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-01550-z.

Peris, D., Labandeira, C. C., Pe√Īalver, E., Delcl√≤s, X., Barr√≥n, E. y P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. 2017. The case of Darwinylus marcosi (Insecta: Coleoptera: Oedemeridae): A Cretaceous shift from a gymnosperm to an angiosperm pollinator mutualism. Communicative & Integrative Biology 10(4): 897‚Äď904. DOI:10.1080/19420889. 2017.1325048.

Peris, D., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Pe√Īalver, E., Delcl√≤s, X., Barr√≥n, E. y Labandeira, C. C. 2017. False Blister Beetles and the Expansion of Gymnosperm-Insect Pollination Modes before Angiosperm Dominance. Current Biology 27(6): 897‚Äď904. DOI:10.1016/j.cub.2017.02.009.

S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A., Pe√Īalver, E., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. y Delcl√≤s, X. 2015. A rich and diverse tanaidomorphan (Crustacea: Tanaidacea) assemblage associated with Early Cretaceous resin-producing forests in North Iberia: palaeobiological implications. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 13(8): 645‚Äď676. DOI:10.1080/14772019.2014.944946.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E. & Engel, M. 2016. A defensive behavior and plant-insect interaction in Early Cretaceous amber ‒ the case of the immature lacewing Hallucinochrysa diogenesi. Arthropod Structure and Development, 45: 133‒139.

Pe√Īalver, E., Arillo, A, P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Riccio, M.L., Delcl√≤s, X, Barr√≥n, E. & Grimaldi, D.A. 2015. Long-proboscid Flies as Pollinators of Mesozoic Gymnosperms. Current Biology 25(14): 1917‒1923.

Arillo, A., Pe√Īalver, E., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Delcl√≤s, X., Criscione, J., Barden, P. M., Riccio, M. L. & Grimaldi, D. A. 2015. Long-proboscid brachyceran flies in Cretaceous amber (Diptera: Stratiomyomorpha: Zhangsolvidae). Systematic Entomology 40: 242‒267.
S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A., Pe√Īalver, E., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. & Delcl√≤s, X. 2014. A rich and diverse tanaidomorphan (Crustacea: Tanaidacea) assemblage associated with Early Cretaceous resin-producing forests in North Iberia: palaeobiological implications. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology.

Pe√Īalver, E. & P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. 2014. Unearthing the secrets of ancient immature insects. eLife 3: e03443. DOI: 10.7554/eLife.03443

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Saupe, E. E. & Selden, P. A. 2013. New lagonomegopid spiders (Araneae: ‚ĆLagonomegopidae) from Early Cretaceous Spanish amber. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 11(5): 531‒553.

Engel, M. S. & P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. 2012. A New Species of Roach from the Jurassic of India (Blattaria: Mesoblattinidae). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 85(1): 1‒4.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E., Speranza, M., Wierzchos, J., Ascaso, C. & Engel, M. S. 2012. Early evolution and ecology of camouflage in insects. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 109(52): 21414‒21419.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. Heads, S. W., Hinojosa-Diaz, I. A. & Engel, M. S. 2012. The first record of Protogryllinae from the Jurassic of India (Orthoptera: Protogryllidae). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 85(1): 53‒58.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Pe√Īalver, E. & Ortega-Blanco, J. 2012. A new species of the diverse Cretaceous genus Cretevania Rasnitsyn, 1975 (Hymenoptera: Evaniidae) from Spanish amber. Zootaxa 3514: 70-78.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Pe√Īalver, E., Delcl√≤s, X. & Engel, M. S. 2012. Snakefly diversity in Early Cretaceous amber from Spain (Neuropterida: Raphidioptera). Zookeys 204: 1‒40.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Perrichot, V., Ortega-Blanco, J., Delcl√≤s, X. & Engel, M. S. 2012. Description of the male of Megalava truncata Perrichot, 2009 (Hymenoptera: Megalyridae) in Early Cretaceous Spanish amber from El Soplao. Zootaxa 3274: 29‒35.

Saupe, E. E., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Selden, P. A., Delcl√≤s, X., Tafforeau, P. & Soriano, C. 2012. New Orchestina (Simon 1882) (Oonopidae, Araneae) from Cretaceous ambers of Spain and France: first spiders imaged using phasecontrast X-ray synchrotron microtomography. Palaeontology 55(1): 127‒143.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E. & Arillo, A. 2011. Biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from the Early Cretaceous El Soplao amber (N Spain). Cretaceous Research 32: 750‒761.

Najarro, M., Pe√Īalver, E., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Ortega-Blanco, J., Menor-Salv√°n, C., Barr√≥n, E., Soriano, C., Rosales, I., L√≥pez del Valle, R., Velasco, F., Tornos, F., Daviero-Gomez, V., Gomez, B. & Delcl√≤s, X. 2010. A review of the El Soplao amber outcrop, Early Cretaceous of Cantabria (Spain). Acta Paleontologica Sinica 84(4): 959‒976.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Nel, A., Pe√Īalver, E. & Delcl√≤s, X. 2010. A new Early Cretaceous snakefly (Raphidioptera: Mesoraphidiidae) from El Soplao amber (Spain). Annales de la Soci√©t√© entomologique de France 46(1‒2): 108‒115.

Soriano, C., Archer, M., Azar, D., Creaser, P., Delcl√≤s, X., Godthelp, H., Hand, S., Jones, A., Nel, A., N√©raudeau, D., Ortega-Blanco, J., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Perrichot, V., Saupe, E., Solorzano-Kraemer, M. & Tafforeau, P. 2010. Synchrotron X-ray imaging of inclusions in amber. Comptes Rendus Palevol 9(6‒7): 361‒368.

Najarro, M., Pe√Īalver, E., Rosales, I., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Daviero-Gomez, V., Gomez, B. & Delcl√≤s, X. 2009. Unusual concentration of Early Albian arthropod bearing amber in the Basque-Cantabrian Basin (El Soplao, Cantabria, Northern Spain): Palaeoenvironmental and palaeobiological implications. Geologica Acta 7(3): 363‒387.

Books and book chapters:

Pe√Īalver, E., Barr√≥n, E., Delcl√≤s, X., √Ālvarez-Fern√°ndez, E., Arillo, A., L√≥pez del Valle, R., Lozano, R., Murillo-Barroso, M., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Peris, D., Rodrigo, A., S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A., Sarto i Monteys, V., Viejo, J.L. y Vila√ßa, R. 2018. Amber in Portugal: state of the art. En: Vaz, N. y S√°, A. (Eds.), Yacimientos paleontol√≥gicos excepcionales en la pen√≠nsula Ib√©rica. Cuadernos del Museo Geominero, IGME, 27: 279‚Äď287.

Pe√Īalver, E., Gonz√°lez-Fern√°ndez, B., L√≥pez del Valle, R., Barr√≥n, E., Lozano, R.P., Rodrigo, A., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R.; Men√©ndez-Casares, E. y Sarto i Monteys, V. 2018. Un nuevo yacimiento de √°mbar cret√°cico en Asturias (Noroeste de Espa√Īa): Resultados preliminares de la excavaci√≥n paleontol√≥gica de 2017 en La Rodada (La Manjoya). En: Vaz, N. y S√°, A. (Eds.), Yacimientos paleontol√≥gicos excepcionales en la pen√≠nsula Ib√©rica. Cuadernos del Museo Geominero, IGME, 27: 289‚Äď299.

L√≥pez del Valle, R. y P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. 2016. El yacimiento paleontol√≥gico de R√°bago/ El Soplao. Pp. 357‚Äď374. En: Actuaciones arqueol√≥gicas en Cantabria. Investigaci√≥n (2004‚Äď2011). Sanz Palomera, G. (Ed.). Gobierno de Cantabria.

Pe√Īalver, E.; Najarro, M.; Rosales, I.; L√≥pez Del Valle, R.; P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. & Delcl√≤s, X. 2011. Cap. 5.2. El √°mbar de R√°bago/El Soplao. Pp. 147-151 y p. 182. In: Dur√°n Valsero, J.J. (Coord.), El Soplao. Una ventana a la ciencia subterr√°nea. El Soplao S.L. Ed., Gobierno de Cantabria: 190 pp.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R.; Pe√Īalver, E.; Delcl√≤s, X.; Najarro, M.; Rosales, I.; Barr√≥n, E.; L√≥pez del Valle, R.; Ortega-Blanco, J.; Arillo, A.; S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A. & Peris, D. 2013. El √°mbar del Cret√°cico Inferior de El Soplao (R√°bago, Cantabria). Informes T√©cnicos, IGME, ‚ÄúAvances en la investigaci√≥n geol√≥gica de la cueva El Soplao y su entorno‚ÄĚ, Madrid, n¬ļ 7: 103-114.

Delcl√≤s, X.; Arillo, A.; Barr√≥n, E.; Dal Corso, J.; Davier√≥-G√≥mez, V.; L√≥pez del Valle, R.; Nel, A.; Ortega-Blanco, J.; Pe√Īalver, E.; P√©rez-de la Fuente, R.; Peris, D.; S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A.; Sol√≥rzano-Kraemer, M.M.; Roghi, G.; Saupe, E. y Selden, P. 2014. El √°mbar del Cret√°cico Inferior de Espa√Īa. 65-68 pp. In: Royo-Torres, R.; Verd√ļ, F.J. y Alcal√°, L. (Coords.), XXX Jornadas de Paleontolog√≠a de la Sociedad Espa√Īola de Paleontolog√≠a. ¬°Fundamental!, 24: 1-282. Teruel.

Pe√Īalver, E.; Arillo, A.; Barr√≥n, E.; Delcl√≤s, X.; P√©rez-de la Fuente, R.; Peris, D. y S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A. 2014. El √°mbar de Espa√Īa como fuente de informaci√≥n paleoecol√≥gica (Albiense: Cret√°cico Inferior). 153-155 pp. In: Royo-Torres, R.; Verd√ļ, F.J. y Alcal√°, L. (Coords.), XXX Jornadas de Paleontolog√≠a de la Sociedad Espa√Īola de Paleontolog√≠a. ¬°Fundamental!, 24: 1-282. Teruel.

Congress contributions:

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A., Pe√Īalver, E., Engel, M. y Delcl√≤s, X. 2019. New lacewings bearing assemblable proboscides from the Cretaceous amber of Spain. The 63rd Annual Meeting of the Palaeontological Association, 18‚Äď20 diciembre 2019, Universitat de Val√®ncia. Libro de res√ļmenes: 117‚Äď118.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Azar, D., Delcl√≤s, X., Engel, M.S. y Pe√Īalver, E. 2019. Neuroptera as an ideal group to study the evolution of larval traits in holometabolan insects. The 8th International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber, 7‚Äď13 abril 2019, Santo Domingo, Rep√ļblica Dominicana. Libro de res√ļmenes, Paul C. Nascimbene (Ed.): 41‚Äď42.

Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E., Barr√≥n, E., Arillo, A., Azar, D., dal Corso, J., Kania, I., Kvańćek, J., Labandeira, C., Nel, A., Menor-Salv√°n, C., Peris, D., Perrichot, V., S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A., Sarto i Monteys, V., Sol√≥rzano Kraemer, M. M. y P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. 2019. Early Cretaceous Spanish amber reveals an important ancient ‚Äúhotspot‚ÄĚ of biodiversity in an insular context. The 8th International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber, 7‚Äď13 abril 2019, Santo Domingo, Rep√ļblica Dominicana. Libro de res√ļmenes, Paul C. Nascimbene (Ed.): 108‚Äď109.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Azar, D., Delcl√≤s, X., Engel, M.S. y Pe√Īalver, E. 2018. Diversity of neuropteran larvae (Insecta) in Early Cretaceous ambers. The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Palaeontological Association, 14‚Äí17 diciembre 2018, University of Bristol. Libro de res√ļmenes: 49‚Äď50.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Pe√Īalver, E., Azar, D. y Engel, M. 2018. Trash-carrying green lacewing larvae from Early Cretaceous Lebanese amber. The 5th International Palaeontological Congress, 9‚Äď13 julio 2018, Paris. Libro de res√ļmenes: 22.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Peris, D., Arillo, A., Barr√≥n, E., Delcl√≤s, X., Grimaldi, D.A., Labandeira, C.C., Nel, A., Nel, P. y Pe√Īalver, E. 2017. Gymnosperm‚Äďinsect pollination relationships in Early Cretaceous amber from Spain. The 61st Annual Meeting of the Palaeontological Association, 17‚Äď19 diciembre 2017, Imperial College, London. Libro de res√ļmenes: 55.

Arillo, A.; Delcl√≤s, X.; S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A.; Peris, D.; P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. & Pe√Īalver, E. 2016. Arthropod hematophagy and vertebrate remains in Cretaceous Spanish amber. Abstracts 7th International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber, Edited by Penney, D. & Ross, A.J., Siri Scientific Press, Edinburgh: p. 6.

Barr√≥n, E., Arillo, A., Gallardo, A., Lozano, R., Onta√Ī√≥n, E., Pe√Īalver, E., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Peris, D., Rodrigo, A., S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A., Sarto i Monteys, V., Viejo J.L. & Delcl√≤s, X. 2015. AMBERIA project: Iberian amber. Multidisciplinary study of the Early Cretaceous forest ecosystems [in Spanish]. XXI Bienal de la Real Sociedad Espa√Īola de Historia Natural, Burgos, Spain. Abstract book: 75-76.

Pérez-de la Fuente, R. & Farrell, B.D. 2014. Digitization of the fossil insect collection from the Museum of Comparative Zoology. The 4th International Paleontological Congress. Mendoza, Argentina. Abstract book: 592.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Pe√Īalver, E., Arillo, A., Peris, D., S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A. & Delcl√≤s, X. 2014. Paleobiotic interactions from Early Cretaceous Spanish amber. The 4th International Paleontological Congress. Mendoza, Argentina. Abstract book: 393.

Barr√≥n, E.; Arillo, A.; Gallardo, A.; Lozano, R.; Onta√Ī√≥n, R.; Pe√Īalver, E.; P√©rez de la Fuente, R.; Peris, D.; Rodrigo, A.; S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A.; Sarto i Monteys, V.; Viejo, J.L. y Delcl√≤s, X. 2015. Proyecto AMBERIA: el √°mbar de Iberia. Estudio pluridisciplinar de los ecosistemas boscosos en el Cret√°cico inferior. Bienal RSEHN, Libro de res√ļmenes, Burgos: 75-76.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Pe√Īalver, E., Delcl√≤s, X. & Engel, M.S. 2013. Neuroptera from Early Cretaceous Spanish amber. The 6th International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber, Byblos, Lebanon. Abstract book: 56-57.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Pe√Īalver, E., Delcl√≤s, X., Speranza, M. & Engel, M.S. 2013. Hallucinochrysa diogenesi, a trash-carrying chrysopoid larva (Neuroptera) from Early Cretaceous Spanish amber. The 6th International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber, Byblos, Lebanon. Abstract book: 54-55.

Pérez-de la Fuente, R. 2011. On the other side of amber [In Spanish]. XII Jornadas del Grupo Ibérico de Aracnología; Plentzia, Bilbao, Spain. Abstract Book: 16. Invited talk.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Saupe, E. E., Selden, P. A., Soriano, C. & Delcl√≤s, X. 2011. New studies on the spiders from the Early Cretaceous of Spain [In Spanish]. XXVII Jornadas de la Sociedad Espa√Īola de Paleontolog√≠a, Sabadell, Barcelona. Abstract Book, Institut Catal√† de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Sabadell, Barcelona: 289‒293.

Saupe, E. E., Pérez-de la Fuente, R. & Selden, P. 2011. New fossil palpimanoids from the Early Cretaceous of Spain, with a combined extant/fossil phylogenetic analysis of the superfamily Palpimanoidea. 35th Meeting of the American Arachnological Society, Portland, Oregon, USA. http://aas.biology.pdx.edu/abstracts.php

Soriano, C., Delcl√≤s, X., Ortega-Blanco, J., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Saupe, E. E. & Tafforeau, P. 2011. The Early Cretaceous amber from Spain and its study using synchrotron light [In Spanish]. XXVII Jornadas de la Sociedad Espa√Īola de Paleontolog√≠a, Sabadell, Barcelona. Abstract Book, Institut Catal√† de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Sabadell, Barcelona: 371‒375.

Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E., Soriano, C., Arillo, A., Barr√≥n, E., Daviero-Gomez, V., Gomez, B., L√≥pez-Del Valle, R., Nel, A., Ortega-Blanco, J., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Roghi, G., Saupe, E., Selden, P.A. & Tafforeau, P. 2010. Early Cretaceous amber-bearing deposits from Spain. The 5th International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber, Beijing, China. Abstract book: 121.

Ortega-Blanco, J., Delcl√≤s, X., Engel, M. S., McKellar, R., Pe√Īalver, E., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Perrichot, V., Rasnitsyn, A. P. & Soriano, C. 2010. Diversity of hymenopteran families in the Early Cretaceous amber from Spain. The 5th International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber, Beijing, China. Abstract book: 60.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E. & Arillo, A. 2010. New biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from the Early Cretaceous Amber of Spain. The 5th International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber, Beijing, China. Abstract book: 159.

Pe√Īalver, E., Najarro, M., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Ortega-Blanco, J., Menor-Salv√°n, C., Barr√≥n, E., Soriano, C., Rosales, I., L√≥pez-Del Valle, R., Velasco, F., Tornos, F., Daviero-Gomez, V., Gomez, B. & Delcl√≤s, X. 2010. A review of the El Soplao amber outcrop, Early Cretaceous of Cantabria (Spain). The 5th International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber, Beijing, China. Abstract book: 158.

Soriano, C., Delcl√≤s, X., Ortega-Blanco, J., Pe√Īalver, E., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Saupe, E., Tafforeau, P. 2010. Spanish Amber Project in the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France). The 5th International Conference on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber, Beijing, China. Abstract book: 69.

Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E., Soriano, C., Arillo, A., Nel, A., Selden, P., Roghi, G., Gomez, B., L√≥pez del Valle, R., Barr√≥n, E., Daviero-Gomez, V., Ortega-Blanco, J. & P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. 2009. Amber-bearing deposits from the Early Cretaceous of Spain palaeobiology and sedimentary environments. 10th International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems and Biota, Teruel. UAM Editions, abstract book: 193‚Äď195.

Ortega-Blanco, J., Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E. & P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. 2009. Wasps (Insecta: Hymenoptera) from the Early Cretaceous amber from Spain. 10th International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems and Biota, Teruel. UAM Editions, Abstract book: 55‚Äď57.

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E., L√≥pez del Valle, R., Ortega-Blanco, J. & Soriano, C. 2009. A first approach to the fossil arthropodofauna of the Early Cretaceous amber from El Soplao (Cantabria, Spain). 10th International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems and Biota, Teruel. UAM Editions, Abstract book: 49‚Äď51.

Abstracts:

P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Engel, M. S., Delcl√≤s, X. y Pe√Īalver, E. 2020. Straight-jawed lacewing larvae (Neuroptera) from Lower Cretaceous Spanish amber, with an account on the known amber diversity of neuropterid immatures. Cretaceous Research 106: 104200. DOI:10.1016/j.cretres.2019.104200.

Three larval neuropterans (Insecta: Neuropterida) with straight mandibulomaxillary stylets are described from Lower Cretaceous (late Albian, ~105 Ma) Spanish amber: a third-instar beaded lacewing (Berothidae) from the Pe√Īacerrada I locality (Burgos, Spain), and two specimens from the San Just locality (Teruel, Spain), i.e., a tentative first-instar beaded lacewing and a remarkable specimen considered a berothid-like mantispoid or dilaroid (instar unknown) displaying a combination of potentially plesiomorphic characters and some unique features. These morphotypes are among the oldest straight-jawed neuropteran larvae described. According to the morphology of the specimens and the taphonomy of the amber pieces where they are embedded, the described forms are regarded as active predators of small soft-bodied arthropods, probably living among bark or other vegetation of the resin-producing forest although they could have frequented the soil. An account of the diversity of larval Neuropterida described and/or figured from amber localities worldwide is provided, including reassessments of some specimens. The gathering diversity of fossil immature neuropterans, like that of their adult counterparts, already leans towards reflecting a greater diversity and disparity of the group in deep time ‚Äíparticularly during the Cretaceous‚Äí than in modern days, and it is worthy of increased research efforts due to the evolutionary and palaeobiological potential that it holds.

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P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. y Pe√Īalver, E. 2019. A mantidfly in Cretaceous Spanish amber provides insights into the evolution of integumentary specialisations on the raptorial foreleg. Scientific Reports 9: 13248. DOI:10.1038/s41598-019-49398-1.

Multiple predatory insect lineages have developed a raptorial lifestyle by which they strike and hold prey using modified forelegs armed with spine-like structures and other integumentary specialisations. However, how structures enabling the raptorial function evolved in insects remains largely hypothetical or inferred through phylogeny due to the rarity of meaningful fossils. This is particularly true for mantidflies (Neuroptera: Mantispidae), which have a scarce fossil record mostly based on rock compressions, namely isolated wings. Here, Aragomantispa lacerata gen. et sp. nov. is described from ca. 105-million-year-old San Just amber (Spain), representing the oldest and one of the few mantidflies hitherto described from amber. The fossil shows exquisitely preserved forefemoral spinelike structures composed of integumentary processes each bearing a modified seta, and prostrate setae on foretibiae and foretarsi. The fine morphology of these structures was unknown in fossil mantidflies. An assessment of integumentary specialisations from raptorial forelegs across mantispoid lacewings is provided. The present finding reveals how the specialised foreleg armature associated to the raptorial lifestyle in extant mantidflies was present yet not fully established by the Early Cretaceous, at least in some lineages, and provides palaeontological evidence supporting certain evolutionary patterns of acquisition of integumentary specialisations related to the raptorial function in the group.

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P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Gehler, A., Farnum, C. W. y Farrell, B. D. 2019. Digitisation as a tool to promote transparency between collections: the case of the Baltic amber from the K√∂nigsberg collection at the Museum of Comparative Zoology. Spanish Journal of Paleontology 34(1): 145‚Äď151. Sin DOI.

Un total de 383 muestras de √°mbar del B√°ltico, incluyendo 43 ejemplares tipo, depositadas en el Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), Harvard University, durante cerca de un siglo se reconocieron como pertenecientes a la colecci√≥n de √°mbar cl√°sica de la Albertus-Universit√§t de K√∂nigsberg. Este hallazgo fue posibilitado en gran medida por la disponibilidad p√ļblica online de im√°genes digitales tomadas durante un proyecto que digitaliz√≥ los m√°s de 30.000 ejemplares de la colecci√≥n de insectos f√≥siles del MCZ. Las muestras de √°mbar se transportaron en mano y se reincorporaron a la porci√≥n de la colecci√≥n K√∂nigsberg original que se salv√≥ tras la Segunda Guerra Mundial, depositada en el Geowissenschaftliches Museum del Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum de la Georg-August-Universit√§t, G√∂ttingen. El presente estudio muestra la importancia de compartir datos de colecci√≥n a trav√©s de registros digitalizados p√ļblicos, entendiendo la digitalizaci√≥n como una herramienta no solo enfocada a la educaci√≥n, divulgaci√≥n e investigaci√≥n, sino tambi√©n clave para redescubrir, rastrear, repatriar y, a la postre, salvaguardar el patrimonio paleontol√≥gico mueble a escala global.

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P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Delcl√≤s, X., Pe√Īalver, E. y Engel, M. S. 2019. A new dustywing (Neuroptera: Coniopterygidae) from the Early Cretaceous amber of Spain. Palaeoentomology 2(3): 279‚Äí288. DOI:10.11646/ palaeoentomology.2.3.13.

A new Cretaceous dustywing, Soplaoconis ortegablancoi gen. et sp. nov. (Neuroptera: Coniopterygidae), is described from four specimens preserved in Early Cretaceous (Albian, ~105Ma) El Soplao amber (Cantabria, northern Spain). Two additional specimens are assigned to this new taxon. A crossvenational abnormality on an area of diagnostic significance from one of the holotype’s forewings provides a reminder of the importance of not ruling out character plasticity or teratoses when evaluating palaeodiversity. A comment on the possible palaeoecological significance of the co-occurrence as syninclusions of plant trichomes with the holotype of S. ortegablancoi and seven of the eleven described Burmese amber dustywing species is provided.

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P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Engel, M. S., Azar, D. y Pe√Īalver, E. 2019. The hatching mechanism of 130-million-year-old insects: an association of neonates, egg shells and egg bursters in Lebanese amber. Palaeontology 62(4): 547‚Äď559. DOI:10.1111/pala.12414.

Hatching is a pivotal moment in the life of most animals. Diverse chemical, behavioural and mechanical methods have evolved in metazoans to break the egg membranes. Among them, many arthropod and vertebrate embryos hatch using ephemeral, frequently convergent structures known as egg bursters. However, the evolutionary processes by which hatching mechanisms and related embryonic structures became established in deep time are poorly understood due to a nearly complete absence from the fossil record. Herein we describe an exceptional c. 130-million-year-old association in Lebanese amber composed of multiple neonate green lacewing larvae, Tragichrysa ovoruptora gen. et sp. nov. (Neuroptera, Chrysopoidea), and conspecific egg remains. Egg bursters with a serrated blade bearing a short process are attached to three longitudinally split egg shells. Embryos of extant green lacewing relatives (Chrysopidae) utilize this egg burster morphotype to open a vertical slit on the egg, after which the burster is moulted and left joined to the empty egg shell. Additionally, the new larval species has extremely elongate dorsal tubercles, an adaptation to carry exogenous debris for protection and camouflage also known from other Cretaceous chrysopoids but absent in modern relatives. The present discovery demonstrates that the hatching mechanism of modern green lacewings was established in the chrysopoid lineage by the Early Cretaceous and proves through direct fossil evidence how some morphological traits related to hatching and linked behaviours, at least in insect embryos, have been subject to a high degree of evolutionary conservatism.

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P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Hoffeins, C. y Roh√°ńćek, J. 2018. A new Acartophthalmites Hennig from Eocene Baltic amber (Diptera: Acalyptratae). Zookeys 737: 125‚Äď139. DOI:10.3897/zookeys.737.20639.

A new fossil fly species, Acartophthalmites willii sp. n. (Diptera: Acalyptratae: Opomyzoidea) from Baltic amber (Eocene, 56‚ąí33.9 Ma), is described based on a male originally assigned by Hennig (1969) to A. tertiaria Hennig, 1965, who erroneously also referred to it in the same work as ‚ÄúA. electrica Hennig‚ÄĚ (unavailable name). The new species, representing the third named species of the extinct genus with un¬¨clear familial relationships Acartophthalmites Hennig, 1965, is herein described and illustrated in detail, and its systematic implications and relationships are discussed. From the morphological standpoint, the new species represents an intermediate form between the two formerly described species within the genus, therefore expanding the character combination diversity in this lineage of acalyptrate flies. The genus Acartophthalmites is considered to be most closely related to Clusiidae and, therefore, it is herein tenta¬¨tively classified within the superfamily Opomyzoidea. The current work takes part of an effort to review the Acartophthalmites diversity in order to gain knowledge on the morphological data from the specimens described within the genus and ultimately enable a reliable analysis of its phylogenetic relationships with other acalyptrates.

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P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Pe√Īalver, E., Azar, D. y Engel, M. S. 2018. A soil-carrying lacewing larva in Early Cretaceous Lebanese amber. Scientific Reports 8: 16663. DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-34870-1.

Diverse organisms protect and camouflage themselves using varied materials from their environment. This adaptation and associated behaviours (debris-carrying) are well known in modern green lacewing larvae (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), mostly due to the widespread use of these immature insects in pest control. However, the evolutionary history of this successful strategy and related morphological adaptations in the lineage are still far from being understood. Here we describe a novel green lacewing larva, Tyruschrysa melqart gen. et sp. nov., from Early Cretaceous Lebanese amber, carrying a preserved debris packet composed by soil particles entangled among specialised setae of extremely elongate tubular tubercles. The new morphotype has features related to the debris-carrying habit that are unknown from extant or extinct green lacewings, namely a high number of tubular tubercle pairs on the abdomen and tubular tubercle setae with mushroom-shaped endings that acted as anchoring points for debris. The current finding expands the diversity of exogenous materials used by green lacewing larvae in deep time, and represents the earliest direct evidence of debris-carrying in the lineage described to date. The debris-carrying larval habit likely played a significant role during the initial phases of diversification of green lacewings.

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Pe√Īalver, E., Arillo, A., Delcl√≤s, X., Peris, D., Grimaldi, D. A., Anderson, S. R., Nascimbene, P. C. y P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. 2017. Ticks parasitised feathered dinosaurs as revealed by Cretaceous amber assemblages. Nature Communications 8: 1924. DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-01550-z.

Ticks are currently among the most prevalent blood-feeding ectoparasites, but their feeding habits and hosts in deep time have long remained speculative. Here, we report direct and indirect evidence in 99 million-year-old Cretaceous amber showing that hard ticks and ticks of the extinct new family Deinocrotonidae fed on blood from feathered dinosaurs, non-avialan or avialan excluding crown-group birds. A ‚ĆCornupalpatum burmanicum hard tick is entangled in a pennaceous feather. Two deinocrotonids described as ‚ĆDeinocroton draculi gen. et sp. nov. have specialised setae from dermestid beetle larvae (hastisetae) attached to their bodies, likely indicating cohabitation in a feathered dinosaur nest. A third conspecific specimen is blood-engorged, its anatomical features suggesting that deinocrotonids fed rapidly to engorgement and had multiple gonotrophic cycles. These findings provide insight into early tick evolution and ecology, and shed light on poorly known arthropod‚Äďvertebrate interactions and potential disease transmission during the Mesozoic.

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Peris, D., Labandeira, C. C., Pe√Īalver, E., Delcl√≤s, X., Barr√≥n, E. y P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. 2017. The case of Darwinylus marcosi (Insecta: Coleoptera: Oedemeridae): A Cretaceous shift from a gymnosperm to an angiosperm pollinator mutualism. Communicative & Integrative Biology 10(4): 897‚Äď904. DOI:10.1080/19420889. 2017.1325048.

Abundant gymnosperm pollen grains associated with the oedemerid beetle Darwinylus marcosi Peris, 2016 were found in Early Cretaceous amber from Spain. This discovery provides confirmatory evidence for a pollination mutualism during the mid Mesozoic for the family Oedemeridae (Coleoptera), which today is known to pollinate only angiosperms. As a result, this new record documents a lateral host-plant transfer from an earlier gymnosperm to a later angiosperm, indicating that pollination of the latter is a derived condition within Oedemeridae. This new fossil record exemplifies one of the 4 ecological-evolutionary pollinator cohorts now known to have existed during the global shift from a gymnosperm to an angiosperm dominated global flora. Currently, all direct evidence for pollination during the 35 million-year interval of the mid Cretaceous gymnosperm-to-angiosperm transition entails recognition of gymnosperm pollen grains on insect mouthparts and other body contact surfaces, while analogous records involving angiosperms are lacking. The gathering evidence indicates that angiosperm pollination was preceded by at least 4 gymnosperm pollination modes that served as a functional and ecological prelude to the rise and expansion of angiosperms.

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Peris, D., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R., Pe√Īalver, E., Delcl√≤s, X., Barr√≥n, E. y Labandeira, C. C. 2017. False Blister Beetles and the Expansion of Gymnosperm-Insect Pollination Modes before Angiosperm Dominance. Current Biology 27(6): 897‚Äď904. DOI:10.1016/j.cub.2017.02.009.

During the mid-Cretaceous, angiosperms diversified from several nondiverse lineages to their current global domination [1], replacing earlier gymnosperm lineages [2].Several hypotheses explain this extensive radiation [3], one of which involves proliferation of insect pollinator associations in the transition from gymnosperm to angiosperm dominance. However, most evidence supports gymnosperm‚Äďinsect pollinator associations, buttressed by direct evidence of pollen on insect bodies, currently established for four groups: Thysanoptera (thrips), Neuroptera (lacewings), Diptera (flies), and now Coleoptera (beetles). Each group represents a distinctive pollination mode linked to a unique mouthpart type and feeding guild [4‚Äď9]. Extensive indirect evidence, based on specialized head and mouthpart morphology, is present for one of these pollinator types, the long-proboscid pollination mode [10], representing minimally ten family-level lineages of Neuroptera, Mecoptera (scorpionflies), and Diptera [8, 10, 11]. A recurring feature uniting these pollinator modes is host associations with ginkgoalean, cycad, conifer, and bennettitalean gymnosperms. Pollinator lineages bearing these pollination modes were categorized into four evolutionary cohorts during the 35-million-year-long angiosperm radiation, each defined by its host-plant associations (gymnosperm or angiosperm) and evolutionary pattern (extinction, continuation, or origination) during this interval [12]. Here, we provide the first direct evidence for one cohort, exemplified by the beetle Darwinylus marcosi, family Oedemeridae (false blister beetles), that had an earlier gymnosperm (most likely cycad) host association, later transitioning onto angiosperms [13]. This association constitutes one of four patterns explaining the plateau of family-level plant lineages generally and pollinating insects specifically during the mid-Cretaceous angiosperm radiation [12].

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S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, A., Pe√Īalver, E., P√©rez-de la Fuente, R. y Delcl√≤s, X. 2015. A rich and diverse tanaidomorphan (Crustacea: Tanaidacea) assemblage associated with Early Cretaceous resin-producing forests in North Iberia: palaeobiological implications. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 13(8): 645‚Äď676. DOI:10.1080/14772019.2014.944946.

The extinct tanaidomorphan diversity from Early Cretaceous Spanish amber, currently comprising 26 specimens, is reassessed. The fossil family Alavatanaidae Vonk & Schram, 2007, described from Spanish amber, is revised on account of new preparation of type specimens and the discovery of new material. The described tanaidomorphan taxa are classified within the superfamily Paratanaoidea. An emended diagnosis for Alavatanaidae is provided, as well as for the genera Alavatanais Vonk & Schram, 2007 and Proleptochelia Vonk & Schram, 2007, and their respective species Alavatanais carabe Vonk & Schram, 2007 and Proleptochelia tenuissima Vonk & Schram, 2007. Three new species, two of them classified in a new genus each, are described: Alavatanais margulisae S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, Pe√Īalver & Delcl√≤s sp. nov., Eurotanais terminator S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, Pe√Īalver & Delcl√≤s gen. et sp. nov. and Electrotanais monolithus S√°nchez-Garc√≠a, Pe√Īalver & Delcl√≤s gen. et sp. nov. Proleptochelia euskadiensis Vonk & Schram, 2007 is considered a junior synonym of A. carabe, and the genus Proleptochelia, together with its type and only species P. tenuissima, is left without familial placement within Paratanaoidea. Within this superfamily, Alavatanaidae is closely related to Leptocheliidae. Also, morphological variability due to sexual dimorphism in the studied paratanaoids has been determined. Multiple lines of taphonomic and palaeobiological evidence indicate that the Spanish amber tanaids were most likely inhabitants of wet or moist forest floors.

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